Fish Farms and Mangroves

In class on Wednesday we briefly discussed fish farms and their negative impact on the quality of fish. As fish farming is beginning to take a more industrial form, the animals experience increased stress and therefore their meat is of lesser quality (The Disassembly Line, 21). This is not the only problem with fish farming, however.

Over my junior year in high school I traveled to The Island School on Eleuthera Island in the Bahamas, a semester program that focuses on sustainability and living well in that region of the world. It was a fantastic experience, and I spent some of my time there learning about the importance of the mangroves that line the coasts of Eleuthera. They are a key nursery for baby fish, and they help filter water as it makes its way back into the ocean. One of the biggest problems in the Bahamas right now are the loss of these habitats, and one of the biggest culprits are coastal fish farms. Huge sections of mangroves are dredged in order to make room for these farms. Often times the farms will fail, leaving large areas of wasted coast. Clearly, fish farming has a huge negative impact on the environment, along with a negative impact on fish quality.

 

Dredged mangroves

Dredged mangroves